Viewing entries in
bathroom design

Comment

Designing a Kid's Bathroom That Ages With Your Kid

For interior designers, there is nothing more fun that creating a special space just for the kids. We spend hours and thousands of dollars to design fantastic bathrooms for the parents, so why not spend the same energy level on the bathrooms for younger members of the family?

JASON BALL interiors has recently completed a number of projects involving bathrooms designed for children. I think parents are hesitant to design kid-specific bathrooms because they're worried their children will go out of style or might decide they don't like the look in a few years. So, how do you design a bathroom that will either stand the test of time or grow with your child?

Here are the ways in which I design a bathroom that can grow as your kid gets older.

Start with classic elements, layer on the details. Start with the basic design elements like cabinetry, lighting, etc., to create a solid foundation. Cabinetry with simple details, or finished in a classic color or stain color allows you to work with the other design elements to create a fun, playful bathroom. In the bathroom below, we started with a classic inset vanity and solid color counter top, and then paired them with nautical-inspired lighting and mirrors, and a beautiful wood wall for a bathroom fitting for two boys. 

Use wall color in smart ways. In this girl's bathroom, we wanted a room that was young, playful and appropriately girly. The classically-styled vanity with crystal knobs and princess-like mirrors lay the foundation. But, it's the pink wall color that really makes the statement. We didn't want just a nice, pretty pink, but a pink that had presence. And, since it's paint, it can easily be changed if the daughter decides she doesn't like pink in a few years.  

jason-ball-interiors-pink-bathroom

Accent tile is your friend. Many homeowners shy away from using tile that's too specific to a certain look. However, with some thoughtful planning, using an accent tile to create a special look can be switched out down the road fairly easily (by a professional of course). This boy's bathroom is about the playful green wall color and the glass circle tiles in the shower.  If green is no longer a favorite color, change the wall color and change the accent tile. Of course, this takes a little more effort and money, but it's still less expensive than changes out the entire bathroom.

jason-ball-interiors-green-boys-bathroom

I hope these bathrooms give you inspiration to bring some style to the bathrooms of your youngest family members. I would love to hear your stories too.

ABOUT JASON BALL interiors. Jason is an interior designer based in Portland, Oregon serving residential clients throughout Oregon and Washington and beyond. To see examples of his design work, visit the Portfolio page. For an evaluation of your upcoming projects, contact Jason Ball at (503) 267-2352 or via e-mail at jason@jasonballinteriors.com.

Comment

Comment

Glass as a Design Element

As interior designers, the JBi team is constantly looking for ways to push our own boundaries and bring fresh ideas to the table with our clients. I was recently asked by a client what I thought of doing a stair railing out of glass. It wasn't that I hadn't seen it done before or was opposed to the idea, I just didn't think she would like it. This simple conversation reminded me on the importance of looking out for ways to use standard materials in new and different ways from what we expect. Glass is one of those materials we use in a multitude of ways on a regular basis - shower enclosures, windows and doors, glass tile. But what does it look like when we use this material in an application beyond the unexpected? Well, that's what this post is all about. I went searching for examples of glass used in expected and unexpected ways. The comparison shows how we can take the use of this material and elevate it beyond the norm.

Shower Enclosures. We all know the frameless shower enclosure. Beautifully radiant 3/8" glass with polished edges paired with simply elegant hardware creates a stunning shower stall. But what if we took the use of glass to the edge and created the entire bathroom inside a glass room? This use allows us to "carve" out a bathroom of a room without making the room feel smaller. The glass keeps the room visually open and allows for transference of light throughout the space.

Design by TURETT COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTS

Photograph by Elad Gonen and Zeev Beech

Doors, windows and walls, oh my! This will sound silly, but we all know about the use of glass in doors and windows. Yes, the first picture below pushes the boundary slightly by using a set of windows as an entire wall. But, glass is rarely used as internal walls in a building (see previous bathroom example too). In an open space, glass walls can be used as room dividers to maintain the openness, but also provide a little extra privacy and feeling of division between specific use areas.

Design by thirdstone, inc

Design by Morlen Sinoway Atelier

Stair railings and steps. The house on which we're working (mentioned above) will be a contemporary home with glass used in some interesting and different ways. It feels like a natural extension then to use glass as the stair railings. We're going to combine the glass with metal posts and handrail. The next natural extension would be to take the glass from the railings and use it as the actual steps. The open glass steps keeps what would otherwise be an imposing architectural feature light and airy.

Design by Manchester Architects Inc

Design by AR Design Studio Ltd

Glass backsplash. Besides shower enclosures, glass tile is probably the other most common use of glass. Mosaics or larger format tiles are used in bathrooms and as kitchen splashes to create a range of different looks - contemporary to traditional. The beauty of glass in this form is its flexibility. Recently though I've started seeing glass backsplashes take on a slightly different form as back-painted sheet glass. This look is super contemporary and easy to clean, an appealing benefit on both fronts.

Design by Exquisite Kitchen Design

Design by Navo Design Studio

What is your favorite way to use glass in your home? We'd love to hear from you.

About JASON BALL interiors. We are a team of interior designers based in Portland, Oregon serving residential and commercial clients throughout Oregon and Washington, and beyond. To see examples of our design work, visit the Portfolio page. For an evaluation of your upcoming projects, contact Jason Ball at (503) 267-2352 or via e-mail at jason@jasonballinteriors.com. We look forward to being your interior design team.

Comment

Comment

Before & After: Updating A 90s Master Bathroom

With the huge number of houses built in the 1990s built throughout Portland, there are a glut of houses ready to be remodeled, particularly the master bathrooms. As was popular in that era in home building, bright brass was used everywhere. When these clients approached JASON BALL interiors, they had already updated the rest of their home but weren't sure how to tackle the master bathroom. As the design team began to understand the clients' aesthetics, it became clear they wanted a bathroom with an elegant feel, but not out of place in the rest of the home. We focused on the broad brush strokes of color, texture and pattern. The "stone" floor is paired with a refined herringbone tile. By taking out the large built-in (and barely used) jetted tub, we increased the feeling of space, put in some additional storage and wrapped a wall around the back of the tub, also covered in the herringbone tile, to define the space. Since the existing cabinetry functioned just fine, we decided to keep it, but applied a deep true black paint for some added drama. Sconces and mirrors were placed on top of the tiled wall. A soothing sea-glass blue tone on the wall and elegant embroidered fabric valances complete the look. Not a bad way to start and end each day.

lorraine- master-bathroom-remodel-1

lorraine- master-bathroom-remodel-2

After: Tile detail in the shower

Designing a master bathroom is about creating a retreat from the day. It's about soothing tones, rich materials and subtle textures. Lighting should be flexible - bright enough for daily tasks and able to be dimmed for restful soaks in the bathtub. What do you want your master bathroom to feel like? What do you want it to say about the way you live?

About JASON BALL interiors. We are a team of interior designers based in Portland, Oregon serving residential clients throughout Oregon and Washington and beyond. To see examples of our design work, visit the Portfolio page. For an evaluation of your upcoming projects, contact Jason Ball at (503) 267-2352 or via e-mail at jason@jasonballinteriors.com. We look forward to being your interior design team.

Comment

1 Comment

Concrete and the Final Apocalypse

Okay, we all know the world was supposed to end today. Thankfully, it did not - I have a huge install on Saturday and I would really NOT like leaving a project incomplete (insert smiley face here). Of course, I jest. The world is still here and we're all plugging along. All this talk of the coming apocalypse got me thinking about the nuclear bomb shelters so popular in the 1950s and 1960s. Whenever we see pictures of a bomb shelter, it's a big gray box made out of concrete. Concrete, however, is one of the few building materials that can be formed, molded, shaped, colored, textured, transformed, etc. If you start really looking through high end design magazines, you start to see concrete everywhere. Interior designers love the flexibility this particular material allows. In putting together this short article, I wanted to find a range of examples in which concrete is used to it's fullest capability. You'll see concrete in both modern and classical setting. You'll see it in a rigid shape and in what looks like it's in mid-flow. The flexibility allows interior designers and architects to be as creative as they want. Let's call this an "Ode to Fly Ash."

Portland interior designers talk about use of concrete in traditional space

concrete sink used in contemporary bathroom design

industrial use of concrete in interior design of dining room

concrete fireplace surround with dark wood details

interior designers, Portland, Oregon talk about use of concrete in interior design

concrete wall used as focal wall in bathroom design

 

Stop by the Concreteworks website to see concrete used in even more ways - tiles, counters, integrated sinks, outdoor spaces. It's inspiring. I hope you're inspired to consider concrete in your next project.

1 Comment

Comment

Creating Your Perfect Bathing Experience

The winter months always get me wanting to take more relaxing soaks at the end of a long and productive design day. The interior designers at JASON BALL interiors have been working on the designs for several bathrooms this past week and just wrapped up two great bathroom remodel projects (which might be our favorites so far), so we have bathrooms on the brain. There has been a trend the past few years to take out the large, built-in jetted tubs so popular in the late 1980s and 1990s, and replace them with elegant freestanding tubs. The beauty of the freestanding tub is the range of styles available to compliment any design aesthetic. Whether modern, contemporary, traditional or vintage, there is a tub out there to fit your desired look. In a master bathroom, the bathtub is more about creating a truly luxurious bathing experience. When designing a master retreat, we look for opportunities to enhance the experience - place the tub by a window, create a bathing nook, design a true spa-like experience through the use of materials. And, if space allows, we want the bathroom to simply be an extension of nearby living spaces. All of these elements aid in creating a moment of indulgence we all deserve at some point of the day.

If you're planning for a master bathroom remodel, here is some inspiration to consider. Sometimes all it takes is a little inspiration to get us started down the path.

 

So, which of these is your dream bathroom? I know which is my favorite (I mean, who wouldn't want to take a bath with Hawaii at your toes?).

 

About JASON BALL interiors. We are a team of interior designers based in Portland, Oregon serving residential clients throughout Oregon and Washington and beyond. To see examples of our design work, visit the Portfolio page. For an evaluation of your upcoming projects, contact Jason Ball at (503) 267-2352 or via e-mail at jason@jasonballinteriors.com. We look forward to being your interior design team.

 

Comment